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0 0.5 1 1.5 2+ PASC 5% Improvement Relative Risk HCQ for COVID-19  Shukla et al.  Prophylaxis Is pre-exposure prophylaxis with HCQ beneficial for COVID-19? Retrospective 679 patients in India (July - October 2021) No significant difference in PASC c19hcq.org Shukla et al., The Lancet Regional Hea.., Dec 2022 Favors HCQ Favors control

An observational multi-centric COVID-19 sequelae study among health care workers

Shukla et al., The Lancet Regional Health - Southeast Asia, doi:10.1016/j.lansea.2022.100129, CTRI/2021/06/034255
Dec 2022  
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HCQ for COVID-19
1st treatment shown to reduce risk in March 2020
 
*, now known with p < 0.00000000001 from 421 studies, recognized in 42 countries.
No treatment is 100% effective. Protocols combine complementary and synergistic treatments. * >10% efficacy in meta analysis with ≥3 clinical studies.
3,800+ studies for 60+ treatments. c19hcq.org
Retrospective 679 healthcare workers post COVID-19 discharge, 76 using HCQ prophylaxis, showing no significant difference in PASC.
risk of PASC, 5.0% lower, RR 0.95, p = 0.78, treatment 22 of 76 (28.9%), control 184 of 603 (30.5%), NNT 64, odds ratio converted to relative risk.
Effect extraction follows pre-specified rules prioritizing more serious outcomes. Submit updates
Shukla et al., 13 Dec 2022, retrospective, India, peer-reviewed, survey, 31 authors, study period July 2021 - October 2021, trial CTRI/2021/06/034255. Contact: ajay.pharm@aiimsbhopal.edu.in.
This PaperHCQAll
An observational multi-centric COVID-19 sequelae study among health care workers
Ajay Kumar Shukla, Shubham Atal, Aditya Banerjee, Ratinder Jhaj, Sadasivam Balakrishnan, Preeta Kaur Chugh, Denis Xavier, Atiya Faruqui, Aakanksha Singh, Ramasamy Raveendran, Jayanthi Mathaiyan, Jeevitha Gauthaman, Urwashi I Parmar, Raakhi K Tripathi, Sandhya K Kamat, Niyati Trivedi, Prashant Shah, Janki Chauhan, Harihar Dikshit, Hitesh Mishra, Rajiv Kumar, Dinesh Kumar Badyal, Monika Sharma, Mamta Singla, Bikash Medhi, Ajay Prakash, Rupa Joshi, Nabendu S Chatterjee, Jerin Jose Cherian, Ved Prakash Kamboj, Nilima Kshirsagar
The Lancet Regional Health - Southeast Asia, doi:10.1016/j.lansea.2022.100129
Background India has seen more than 43 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 as of April 2022, with a recovery rate of 98.8%, resulting in a large section of the population including the healthcare workers (HCWs), susceptible to develop post COVID sequelae. This study was carried out to assess the nature and prevalence of medical sequelae following COVID-19 infection, and risk factors, if any. Methods This was an observational, multicenter cross-sectional study conducted at eight tertiary care centers. The consenting participants were HCWs between 12 and 52 weeks post discharge after COVID-19 infection. Data on demographics, medical history, clinical features of COVID-19 and various symptoms of COVID sequelae was collected through specific questionnaire. Finding Mean age of the 679 eligible participants was 31.49 ± 9.54 years. The overall prevalence of COVID sequelae was 30.34%, with fatigue (11.5%) being the most common followed by insomnia (8.5%), difficulty in breathing during activity (6%) and pain in joints (5%). The odds of having any sequelae were significantly higher among participants who had moderate to severe COVID-19 (OR 6.51; 95% CI 3.46-12.23) and lower among males (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.39-0.76). Besides these, other predictors for having sequelae were age (≥45 years), presence of any
Appendix A. Supplementary data Supplementary data related to this article can be found at https://doi. org/10.1016/j.lansea.2022.100129.
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