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0 0.5 1 1.5 2+ Mortality 65% Improvement Relative Risk c19hcq.org Budhiraja et al. HCQ for COVID-19 LATE TREATMENT Is late treatment with HCQ beneficial for COVID-19? Retrospective 976 patients in India Lower mortality with HCQ (p<0.000001) Budhiraja et al., medRxiv, doi:10.1101/2020.11.16.20232223 Favors HCQ Favors control
Clinical Profile of First 1000 COVID-19 Cases Admitted at Tertiary Care Hospitals and the Correlates of their Mortality: An Indian Experience
Budhiraja et al., medRxiv, doi:10.1101/2020.11.16.20232223 (Preprint)
Budhiraja et al., Clinical Profile of First 1000 COVID-19 Cases Admitted at Tertiary Care Hospitals and the Correlates of their.., medRxiv, doi:10.1101/2020.11.16.20232223 (Preprint)
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Retrospective 976 hospitalized patients with 834 treated with HCQ+AZ showing HCQ mortality relative risk RR 0.35, p < 0.0001. Note that in this case HCQ was recommended for mild/moderate cases, so more severe cases may not have received HCQ (which may also be why they became severe cases). We note that this is opposite to a common bias in HCQ studies - in many cases HCQ was more likely to be given to more severe cases. This study is excluded in the after exclusion results of meta analysis: excessive unadjusted differences between groups.
risk of death, 65.4% lower, RR 0.35, p < 0.001, treatment 69 of 834 (8.3%), control 34 of 142 (23.9%), NNT 6.4.
Effect extraction follows pre-specified rules prioritizing more serious outcomes. Submit updates
Budhiraja et al., 18 Nov 2020, retrospective, India, preprint, 12 authors.
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Abstract: medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.11.16.20232223; this version posted November 18, 2020. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. All rights reserved. No reuse allowed without permission. Clinical Profile of First 1000 COVID-19 Cases Admitted at Tertiary Care Hospitals and the Correlates of their Mortality: An Indian Experience Sandeep Budhiraja1,3, Aakriti Soni1, Vinitaa Jha1, Abhaya Indrayan1, Arun Dewan2, Omender Singh2, Yogendra Pal Singh2 , Indermohan Chugh3, Vijay Arora3, Rajesh Pande4, Abdul Ansari5 , Sujeet Jha6 1 Clinical Directorate, Maxhealthcare, New Delhi; 2Critical Care, Maxhealthcare, Delhi NCR; Internal Medicine Maxhealthcare, New Delhi; 4Critical Care, BLK Hospital, New Delhi; 5 Critical Care, Nanavati Superspeciality Hospital, Mumbai; 6Endocrinology, Maxhealthcare, New Delhi 3 Corresponding author: Dr Abhaya Indrayan, Clinical Directorate, Max Healthcare, Press Enclave Road, New Delhi 110 017 Email: a.indrayan@gmail.com ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the clinical profile and factors leading to increased mortality in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients admitted to a group of hospitals in India. Design: A records-based study of the first 1000 patients with a positive result on real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction assay for SARS-CoV-2 admitted to our facilities. Various factors such as demographics, presenting symptoms, co-morbidities, ICU admission, oxygen requirement and ventilator therapy were studied. Results: Of the 1000 patients, 24 patients were excluded due to lack of sufficient data. Of the remaining 976 in the early phase of the epidemic, males were admitted twice as much as females (67.1% and 32.9%, respectively). Mortality in this initial phase was 10.6% and slightly higher for males and steeply higher for older patients. More than 8% reported no symptoms and the most common presenting symptoms were fever (78.3%), productive cough (37.2%), and dyspnea (30.64%). More than one-half (53.6%) had no co-morbidity. The major co-morbidities were hypertension (23.7%), diabetes without (15.4%), and with complications (9.6%). The co-morbidities were associated with higher ICU admissions, greater use of ventilators as well as higher mortality. A total of 29.9% were admitted to the ICU, with a mortality rate of 32.2%. Mortality was steeply higher in those requiring ventilator support (55.4%) versus those who never required ventilation (1.4%). The total duration of hospital stay was just a day longer in patients admitted to the ICU than those who remained in wards. Conclusion: Male patients above the age of 60 and with co-morbidities faced the highest rates of mortality. They should be admitted to the hospital in early stage of the disease and given aggressive treatment to help reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with COVID-19. 1 NOTE: This preprint reports new research that has not been certified by peer review and should not be used to guide clinical practice. medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.11.16.20232223; this version posted November 18, 2020. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. All rights reserved. No reuse allowed without permission. KEY..
Late treatment
is less effective
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